Monday, August 25, 2014

Relearning the Foolishness of the Cross

This statement is quite telling:

And while we grieve rejection, we should not be shocked or ashamed by it. That probationary year unearthed a hidden assumption that I could be nuanced or articulate or culturally engaged or compassionate enough to make the gospel more acceptable to my neighbors. But that belief is prideful. From its earliest days, the gospel has been both a comfort and an offense.
It is from an essay over at Christianity Today about Vanderbilt's rejection of any group that hold to distinctives,  especially Christian doctrinal statements.

There is a lot of ironic points in the essay which could make for "see we told you" moments--as a good number of more conservative commentators have been saying for years. However the essay is helpful as a cultural marker and pointer to the direction things are heading--even if people have noted this for a while.

It is also a disappointment to see that the idea of the university is being lost in favor of radical pluralism where discrimination is valued more than discernment--shibboleths more that reason arguments and debate.

The larger point is that the quest for a more culturally acceptable for of Christianity does not end as the purveyors hope. Props to this group for not compromising basic orthodox convictions, such as the resurrection-- but it is impossible for Christianity to win the favor of its cultured despisers. Paul knew this as early as 1 Corinthians when he spoke of the foolishness of the Cross. Whether we like it or not the academy today is largely looking for a wisdom that comports with worldly standards--as wisdom which cannot in the end ever find allowance for or acceptance of the gospel.

Read the whole thing.

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